Don’t let your batteries cause a blaze

Batteries being thrown away in the household rubbish causing a fire risk at our waste facilities.

 
Last updated:
18 August 2017

West Sussex residents are being urged to think before they throw away batteries.

 

An increasing number are showing up in the county’s household rubbish, and they all present a fire risk.

 

We have seen a number of fires from batteries or electrical goods over the years, in refuse trucks, and at our waste facilities.

 

With levels going up, especially smaller batteries, the waste and recycling contractors for West Sussex have both flagged their concerns to the County Council.

 

West Sussex County Council's Cabinet Member for the Environment, Deborah Urquhart said: “Any battery has the potential to spark and it can happen so easily; they only need to be damaged or crushed in the truck that collects your waste or your recycling, or at the sites where we process your waste.”

 

“Our recycling trucks are full of dry materials like paper and card, so you can imagine how easily they could catch light. It doesn’t take much, a piece of foil, a staple, even the metal floor of the truck; they can all cause a battery to short.”

 

“And of course, batteries contain hazardous heavy metals which need to be dealt with properly. That’s why you will see battery bins at so many retailers, and of course at our own Household Waste Recycling Sites.”

 

To find your nearest battery recycling point at a shop or supermarket near where you live, enter your postcode here.

https://www.recyclenow.com/local-recycling   

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